suffolk,mayor,bass,brian,brian bass

VOTE BRIAN BASS FOR SUFFOLK MAYOR

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Q: Why are you running for office?

A:  ​In recent years, The City of Suffolk has struggled with fiscal issues that impact both basic and special City services. I am running to help preserve the qualities that make Suffolk unique. I will work to improve the responsiveness of City government to Community interests while at the same time using my experience in local government to provide the professional oversight needed to preserve the full range of services Suffolk residents have historically enjoyed such as Libraries, the Arts, Community Centers, and Parks & Recreation Programs. I will strive to cultivate relationships with the citizens of Suffolk to include them in the government process.

Q: What do you believe to be the top three pressing concerns to the business community in Suffolk?

A:  ​1. Growth and development focused on one area 2. Development creating congestion and frustration to existing businesses 3. Poor planning for future infrastructure in 30-40 year plan.

Q: What is your overall vision for Suffolk in the decades to come?

A:  ​My overall plan would address future growth and development while enhancing our education that would prepare our youth for a better more sustainable future.

Q: ). Do you feel that there is waste in the city budget? If so, please cite specific areas where you would reduce or reallocate funding?

A:  ​I am sure there are some areas that could use some attention, but the main concern I have is ensuring that funds are used for what they are intended.

Q: The city of Suffolk presently has one of the lowest Real Estate Tax rates in the region. Do you believe such rate is proper for the present city services?

A:  ​Yes

Q: Are there any services or programs that you would eliminate or downsize? If so, why?

A:  ​No, not without having all of the facts.

Q:  Are there any city processes or policies that need to be changed?

A:  ​No

Q: How do you plan to familiarize yourself with the issues that come before the council?

1. Get the facts.

2. Weigh all the facts then come to a decision.

3. Once a decision is reached, ACT!

4. Write out and answer the following questions:

a. What is the problem?

b. What are the causes of the problem?

c. What are the possible solutions?

d. What is the best possible solution?

Q: What role should municipal government have in workforce development?

A:  ​Municipal government should assist workforce development in a capacity that promotes growth in educating citizens with all the available options to find work for those that are unemployed or who want to continue on to get an education.

Q: Considering the city’s current revenue stream, how would you balance the needs of education versus other areas in the Suffolk City budget?

A:  ​Education would be the top priority followed by needs highlighted by the citizens.

Q: Do you support an elected or appointed school board?

A:  ​Elected

Q:  What are the most urgent or strategic transportation needs in Suffolk and the region?

A:  ​Flow of future development and how it impacts current infrastucture and the citizens that live in that area.

Q: What funding source would you support for building new transportation infrastructure and maintenance of our failing highway system?   A. Gas Tax,  B. Sales Tax,  C. Tolls,  D. Property Taxes,  E. Other (please note),  F. Rely on State funding,  G. None of the these

A:  ​E. I would look into how our stormwater fee is used.

Q: The City has a very aggressive Economic Development Program to recruit new businesses and retain existing businesses. Are there any additional suggestions you would propose to improve the economy and the city’s tax base?

A:  ​I believe if we focus on improving our schools in a manner that people want to live in our city for the high level of education that is provided we would improve the economy and the city's tax base.

Q: How important do you view downtown Suffolk development in relation to the rest of the city, and what are your priorities for such development?

A:  ​Downtown development is very important in relation to the rest of the city and it would be a main focus of mine when I am elected Mayor.

Q: What are your thoughts on Regionalism?

A:  ​This is one area I believe we must continue to partner with surrounding communities to maintain and build strong relations.

Q: What kind of collaborative partnerships should Suffolk initiate with surrounding communities?

A:  ​We should collaborate in all areas to have a better, more efficient government especially in growth and development.

Q:  If elected, what are your top five priorities for the City of Suffolk during your tenure?

A:  ​My priorities would be education, adequate staffing of City personnel (all departments), infrastructure maintenance, appropriation of funds, and future planning.

Q:  Briefly describe how you would accomplish these goals

A:  ​I would encourage more involvement in our school system by supporting full funding, career days, involvement by City Council, and City staff (not just ribbon cutting and graduation).

I would work on maintaining full staffing in all departments by being informed on any shortfalls addressing the importance to be fully staffed.

Infrastructure will be maintained on a proactive approach, not reactive. By addressing routine maintenance issues this would help sustain infrastructure for longevity and avoid failure of systems that cost more in the long term.

Finances should be applied for what they are intended and approved. The principles of a budget are to ensure funds are spent where they are intended. I will do my best to ensure this happens and there is no special treatment.

Future planning in all areas is of the utmost importance to me, especially with education. If we educate I see a brighter future for the City.

Q:  Where do you stand on the city employee's compensation plan? This will include benefits, insurance and pay?

A:  ​I fully support a compensation plan for a number of reasons. Retaining quality workers requires a strategic plan for compensation that rewards employees for company loyalty. Compensation based in part on seniority with the company shows new employees that your business values workers who choose to remain with the company long-term. This encourages new employees to make a commitment to build a career with your business and deters established employees from jumping to other companies. Experienced workers will think twice about pursuing another opportunity if the new job also comes with a pay cut. By providing health care coverage and paid time off in benefits package will help retain workers.

Q:  The Fire Service is guided by a set of standards provided by the National Fire Protection Agency. NFPAl 710 requires that apparatus (engine) go to calls with a 4 person crew. This rarely occurs in the City of Suffolk. Although we have recently promoted and will be hiring in the upcoming weeks, the stations still will not meet the standard on a regular basis. The shortage will continue to affect the overtime budget as it has for a number of years. The goal is to lower the overtime budget without putting a fire protection employee at risk. Please share your thoughts.

A:  ​I find this unacceptable and the fact that the City is at risk of a lawsuit is troubling. During my working career I have been involved with OSHA 1910 training, safety teams, and BBS (Behavior Based Safety) and putting people at risk compromises everyone. Officially acknowledging the problem for the first time this year, Congress approved $65 million for a new federal program to help cities pay for more firefighters. "We believe that every mayor and governor has a responsibility to ensure that there are adequate public safety professionals in their states and communities," says Marc Short of the Homeland Security Department. "It is our job to make sure that they're best trained and equipped to prevent terrorism and respond if need be." As Mayor I will be fighting for these funds as well as yearly budgeting to help alleviate the shortage of police, fire, and rescue within the City of Suffolk.

Q:  What is your position on using "frozen" positions and continued under staffing for the purposes of salary savings to balance the city's budget?

A:  Again, I find this unacceptable. We cannot put a price on the lives of our public safety servants.

Q: As city employees, our Human Resources department is in place to service the employees. When problems arise that cannot be mediated by the Department Head, the next step is to see the Human Resource department. It has been some of our member's experience that the H.R. department is not capable of seeing that Suffolk's employees are treated fairly and professional. How would you like to see the City Manager direct or hold the H. R. Director accountable for any reported and discovered unfairness or lack of professionalism?

A: I would like the City Manager to use the City of Suffolk employee policy manual as a guide to enforce any violation to hold anyone accountable, not just the H.R. Director.

Q: As a Council person what would be your position on an open door policy for direct input from Public Safety members and/or their representatives within the city?

A: The effective open door policy provides the expectation that employees will address problems first with their supervisor. This solution is simple. Managers can enable and allow access for all employees, within an open door policy. Once they have determined the reason for the employee's visit, however, they have choices they need to make. Employees seek help from senior managers with a variety of issues. But a common issue is that the employee is having problems with their supervisor or manager.

In an open door policy, once an employee has sought out a senior manager, the manager should not always solve the problem, and indeed, in these circumstances - never solve the problem - but he or she must monitor that the problem is solved or responded to by the appropriate people.

When the open door policy is effectively supported,

• the open door policy is honored,

• the chain of command is honored,

• the manager's problem solving skills are enhanced,

• the employee's personal courage, conflict resolution, and problem solving skills are enhanced,

• the organization benefits from shared information and feedback, and

• high employee trust is generated from a successful experience with management

The effective open door policy is a win for all participants and is one I support.

Q: What have you done in the past and/or what are your plans in the future to support Public safety?

A:  I have always been an advocate for public safety, from supporting volunteer fire and rescue to the ones that are paid. My future support would be for increased staffing, public outreach, employee protection, and ensure compensation remains competitive within local region.

Q: Why should Local 2801 endorse you as a candidate for Mayor or Council during this election process?

A: I have lived in Suffolk since I was four years old and my ancestry with the Nansemond Indians establishes a bond I don’t want to break with the City. (Forest Glen High School class of 1988 and Paul D. Camp Community College class of 2012). If anything, my love and passion for this City is what drives me to be the next Mayor in the City of Suffolk. I was a Union member during my employment with International Paper and I understand the importance of what Union 2801 represents to the police, fire and rescue. I believe I can help get Union 2801 the increased staffing, employee protection, and ensure compensation remains competitive within local region.

Q: If endorsed by the IAFF local 2801 or SPOA Local 780 what would like to see as our contribution to your campaign?

A: I would like Local 2801 and Local 780 to help spread the word that they are supporting Brian Bass for Mayor, work the polls on Election Day, and once elected Mayor to continue to work at making the City of Suffolk a thriving, growing community.

Q:  Where do you stand on the city employee's compensation plan? This will include benefits, insurance and pay?

A:  ​I fully support a compensation plan for a number of reasons. Retaining quality workers requires a strategic plan for compensation that rewards employees for company loyalty. Compensation based in part on seniority with the company shows new employees that your business values workers who choose to remain with the company long-term. This encourages new employees to make a commitment to build a career with your business and deters established employees from jumping to other companies. Experienced workers will think twice about pursuing another opportunity if the new job also comes with a pay cut. By providing health care coverage and paid time off in benefits package will help retain workers.

Q:  The Fire Service is guided by a set of standards provided by the National Fire Protection Agency. NFPAl 710 requires that apparatus (engine) go to calls with a 4 person crew. This rarely occurs in the City of Suffolk. Although we have recently promoted and will be hiring in the upcoming weeks, the stations still will not meet the standard on a regular basis. The shortage will continue to affect the overtime budget as it has for a number of years. The goal is to lower the overtime budget without putting a fire protection employee at risk. Please share your thoughts.

A:  ​I find this unacceptable and the fact that the City is at risk of a lawsuit is troubling. During my working career I have been involved with OSHA 1910 training, safety teams, and BBS (Behavior Based Safety) and putting people at risk compromises everyone. Officially acknowledging the problem for the first time this year, Congress approved $65 million for a new federal program to help cities pay for more firefighters. "We believe that every mayor and governor has a responsibility to ensure that there are adequate public safety professionals in their states and communities," says Marc Short of the Homeland Security Department. "It is our job to make sure that they're best trained and equipped to prevent terrorism and respond if need be." As Mayor I will be fighting for these funds as well as yearly budgeting to help alleviate the shortage of police, fire, and rescue within the City of Suffolk.

Q:  What is your position on using "frozen" positions and continued under staffing for the purposes of salary savings to balance the city's budget?

A:  Again, I find this unacceptable. We cannot put a price on the lives of our public safety servants.

Q: As city employees, our Human Resources department is in place to service the employees. When problems arise that cannot be mediated by the Department Head, the next step is to see the Human Resource department. It has been some of our member's experience that the H.R. department is not capable of seeing that Suffolk's employees are treated fairly and professional. How would you like to see the City Manager direct or hold the H. R. Director accountable for any reported and discovered unfairness or lack of professionalism?

A: I would like the City Manager to use the City of Suffolk employee policy manual as a guide to enforce any violation to hold anyone accountable, not just the H.R. Director.

Q: As a Council person what would be your position on an open door policy for direct input from Public Safety members and/or their representatives within the city?

A: The effective open door policy provides the expectation that employees will address problems first with their supervisor. This solution is simple. Managers can enable and allow access for all employees, within an open door policy. Once they have determined the reason for the employee's visit, however, they have choices they need to make. Employees seek help from senior managers with a variety of issues. But a common issue is that the employee is having problems with their supervisor or manager.

In an open door policy, once an employee has sought out a senior manager, the manager should not always solve the problem, and indeed, in these circumstances - never solve the problem - but he or she must monitor that the problem is solved or responded to by the appropriate people.

When the open door policy is effectively supported,

• the open door policy is honored,

• the chain of command is honored,

• the manager's problem solving skills are enhanced,

• the employee's personal courage, conflict resolution, and problem solving skills are enhanced,

• the organization benefits from shared information and feedback, and

• high employee trust is generated from a successful experience with management

The effective open door policy is a win for all participants and is one I support.

Q: What have you done in the past and/or what are your plans in the future to support Public safety?

A:  I have always been an advocate for public safety, from supporting volunteer fire and rescue to the ones that are paid. My future support would be for increased staffing, public outreach, employee protection, and ensure compensation remains competitive within local region.

Q: Why should Local 2801 endorse you as a candidate for Mayor or Council during this election process?

A: I have lived in Suffolk since I was four years old and my ancestry with the Nansemond Indians establishes a bond I don’t want to break with the City. (Forest Glen High School class of 1988 and Paul D. Camp Community College class of 2012). If anything, my love and passion for this City is what drives me to be the next Mayor in the City of Suffolk. I was a Union member during my employment with International Paper and I understand the importance of what Union 2801 represents to the police, fire and rescue. I believe I can help get Union 2801 the increased staffing, employee protection, and ensure compensation remains competitive within local region.

Q: If endorsed by the IAFF local 2801 or SPOA Local 780 what would like to see as our contribution to your campaign?

A: I would like Local 2801 and Local 780 to help spread the word that they are supporting Brian Bass for Mayor, work the polls on Election Day, and once elected Mayor to continue to work at making the City of Suffolk a thriving, growing community.

Q:  Where do you stand on the city employee's compensation plan? This will include benefits, insurance and pay?

A:  ​I fully support a compensation plan for a number of reasons. Retaining quality workers requires a strategic plan for compensation that rewards employees for company loyalty. Compensation based in part on seniority with the company shows new employees that your business values workers who choose to remain with the company long-term. This encourages new employees to make a commitment to build a career with your business and deters established employees from jumping to other companies. Experienced workers will think twice about pursuing another opportunity if the new job also comes with a pay cut. By providing health care coverage and paid time off in benefits package will help retain workers.

Q:  The Fire Service is guided by a set of standards provided by the National Fire Protection Agency. NFPAl 710 requires that apparatus (engine) go to calls with a 4 person crew. This rarely occurs in the City of Suffolk. Although we have recently promoted and will be hiring in the upcoming weeks, the stations still will not meet the standard on a regular basis. The shortage will continue to affect the overtime budget as it has for a number of years. The goal is to lower the overtime budget without putting a fire protection employee at risk. Please share your thoughts.

A:  ​I find this unacceptable and the fact that the City is at risk of a lawsuit is troubling. During my working career I have been involved with OSHA 1910 training, safety teams, and BBS (Behavior Based Safety) and putting people at risk compromises everyone. Officially acknowledging the problem for the first time this year, Congress approved $65 million for a new federal program to help cities pay for more firefighters. "We believe that every mayor and governor has a responsibility to ensure that there are adequate public safety professionals in their states and communities," says Marc Short of the Homeland Security Department. "It is our job to make sure that they're best trained and equipped to prevent terrorism and respond if need be." As Mayor I will be fighting for these funds as well as yearly budgeting to help alleviate the shortage of police, fire, and rescue within the City of Suffolk.

Q:  What is your position on using "frozen" positions and continued under staffing for the purposes of salary savings to balance the city's budget?

A:  Again, I find this unacceptable. We cannot put a price on the lives of our public safety servants.

Q: As city employees, our Human Resources department is in place to service the employees. When problems arise that cannot be mediated by the Department Head, the next step is to see the Human Resource department. It has been some of our member's experience that the H.R. department is not capable of seeing that Suffolk's employees are treated fairly and professional. How would you like to see the City Manager direct or hold the H. R. Director accountable for any reported and discovered unfairness or lack of professionalism?

A: I would like the City Manager to use the City of Suffolk employee policy manual as a guide to enforce any violation to hold anyone accountable, not just the H.R. Director.

Q: As a Council person what would be your position on an open door policy for direct input from Public Safety members and/or their representatives within the city?

A: The effective open door policy provides the expectation that employees will address problems first with their supervisor. This solution is simple. Managers can enable and allow access for all employees, within an open door policy. Once they have determined the reason for the employee's visit, however, they have choices they need to make. Employees seek help from senior managers with a variety of issues. But a common issue is that the employee is having problems with their supervisor or manager.

In an open door policy, once an employee has sought out a senior manager, the manager should not always solve the problem, and indeed, in these circumstances - never solve the problem - but he or she must monitor that the problem is solved or responded to by the appropriate people.

When the open door policy is effectively supported,

• the open door policy is honored,

• the chain of command is honored,

• the manager's problem solving skills are enhanced,

• the employee's personal courage, conflict resolution, and problem solving skills are enhanced,

• the organization benefits from shared information and feedback, and

• high employee trust is generated from a successful experience with management

The effective open door policy is a win for all participants and is one I support.

Q: What have you done in the past and/or what are your plans in the future to support Public safety?

A:  I have always been an advocate for public safety, from supporting volunteer fire and rescue to the ones that are paid. My future support would be for increased staffing, public outreach, employee protection, and ensure compensation remains competitive within local region.

Q: Why should Local 2801 endorse you as a candidate for Mayor or Council during this election process?

A: I have lived in Suffolk since I was four years old and my ancestry with the Nansemond Indians establishes a bond I don’t want to break with the City. (Forest Glen High School class of 1988 and Paul D. Camp Community College class of 2012). If anything, my love and passion for this City is what drives me to be the next Mayor in the City of Suffolk. I was a Union member during my employment with International Paper and I understand the importance of what Union 2801 represents to the police, fire and rescue. I believe I can help get Union 2801 the increased staffing, employee protection, and ensure compensation remains competitive within local region.

Q: If endorsed by the IAFF local 2801 or SPOA Local 780 what would like to see as our contribution to your campaign?

A: I would like Local 2801 and Local 780 to help spread the word that they are supporting Brian Bass for Mayor, work the polls on Election Day, and once elected Mayor to continue to work at making the City of Suffolk a thriving, growing community.

Q:  Where do you stand on the city employee's compensation plan? This will include benefits, insurance and pay?

A:  ​I fully support a compensation plan for a number of reasons. Retaining quality workers requires a strategic plan for compensation that rewards employees for company loyalty. Compensation based in part on seniority with the company shows new employees that your business values workers who choose to remain with the company long-term. This encourages new employees to make a commitment to build a career with your business and deters established employees from jumping to other companies. Experienced workers will think twice about pursuing another opportunity if the new job also comes with a pay cut. By providing health care coverage and paid time off in benefits package will help retain workers.

Q:  The Fire Service is guided by a set of standards provided by the National Fire Protection Agency. NFPAl 710 requires that apparatus (engine) go to calls with a 4 person crew. This rarely occurs in the City of Suffolk. Although we have recently promoted and will be hiring in the upcoming weeks, the stations still will not meet the standard on a regular basis. The shortage will continue to affect the overtime budget as it has for a number of years. The goal is to lower the overtime budget without putting a fire protection employee at risk. Please share your thoughts.

A:  ​I find this unacceptable and the fact that the City is at risk of a lawsuit is troubling. During my working career I have been involved with OSHA 1910 training, safety teams, and BBS (Behavior Based Safety) and putting people at risk compromises everyone. Officially acknowledging the problem for the first time this year, Congress approved $65 million for a new federal program to help cities pay for more firefighters. "We believe that every mayor and governor has a responsibility to ensure that there are adequate public safety professionals in their states and communities," says Marc Short of the Homeland Security Department. "It is our job to make sure that they're best trained and equipped to prevent terrorism and respond if need be." As Mayor I will be fighting for these funds as well as yearly budgeting to help alleviate the shortage of police, fire, and rescue within the City of Suffolk.

Q:  What is your position on using "frozen" positions and continued under staffing for the purposes of salary savings to balance the city's budget?

A:  Again, I find this unacceptable. We cannot put a price on the lives of our public safety servants.

Q: As city employees, our Human Resources department is in place to service the employees. When problems arise that cannot be mediated by the Department Head, the next step is to see the Human Resource department. It has been some of our member's experience that the H.R. department is not capable of seeing that Suffolk's employees are treated fairly and professional. How would you like to see the City Manager direct or hold the H. R. Director accountable for any reported and discovered unfairness or lack of professionalism?

A: I would like the City Manager to use the City of Suffolk employee policy manual as a guide to enforce any violation to hold anyone accountable, not just the H.R. Director.

Q: As a Council person what would be your position on an open door policy for direct input from Public Safety members and/or their representatives within the city?

A: The effective open door policy provides the expectation that employees will address problems first with their supervisor. This solution is simple. Managers can enable and allow access for all employees, within an open door policy. Once they have determined the reason for the employee's visit, however, they have choices they need to make. Employees seek help from senior managers with a variety of issues. But a common issue is that the employee is having problems with their supervisor or manager.

In an open door policy, once an employee has sought out a senior manager, the manager should not always solve the problem, and indeed, in these circumstances - never solve the problem - but he or she must monitor that the problem is solved or responded to by the appropriate people.

When the open door policy is effectively supported,

• the open door policy is honored,

• the chain of command is honored,

• the manager's problem solving skills are enhanced,

• the employee's personal courage, conflict resolution, and problem solving skills are enhanced,

• the organization benefits from shared information and feedback, and

• high employee trust is generated from a successful experience with management

The effective open door policy is a win for all participants and is one I support.

Q: What have you done in the past and/or what are your plans in the future to support Public safety?

A:  I have always been an advocate for public safety, from supporting volunteer fire and rescue to the ones that are paid. My future support would be for increased staffing, public outreach, employee protection, and ensure compensation remains competitive within local region.

Q: Why should Local 2801 endorse you as a candidate for Mayor or Council during this election process?

A: I have lived in Suffolk since I was four years old and my ancestry with the Nansemond Indians establishes a bond I don’t want to break with the City. (Forest Glen High School class of 1988 and Paul D. Camp Community College class of 2012). If anything, my love and passion for this City is what drives me to be the next Mayor in the City of Suffolk. I was a Union member during my employment with International Paper and I understand the importance of what Union 2801 represents to the police, fire and rescue. I believe I can help get Union 2801 the increased staffing, employee protection, and ensure compensation remains competitive within local region.

Q: If endorsed by the IAFF local 2801 or SPOA Local 780 what would like to see as our contribution to your campaign?

A: I would like Local 2801 and Local 780 to help spread the word that they are supporting Brian Bass for Mayor, work the polls on Election Day, and once elected Mayor to continue to work at making the City of Suffolk a thriving, growing community.

ANSWERING THE CALL TO SERVE YOU!

 

suffolk,mayor,bass,brian,brian bass

Tuesday, November 8, 2016



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